Override 2 – SUPER-MECH MANIA! – Review

In Override 2, you’ll enter a series of mech-pilot tournaments and one-off arena matches to become the best fighter possible… Whilst also destroying entire cities and towns in the process – but don’t even worry about that! It’s a rather straightforward affair, with only a handful of modes on offer, that all essentially involve the same thing…

Smacking your opponents senseless.

Override 2’s Mech-Battle Mechanics

The combat in this title is excellent though and feels really intuitive to control. I was very impressed with just how easy it was to pick-up n’ play, and have a grand ol’ time with it. You can punch, kick, shoot, throw, jump and dash around like other fighting games, and each fighter has their own set of ‘special moves’ unique to them. While there are about 20 or so characters on the roster, each special move-set is structured similarly in terms of attack types.

I was very impressed with just how easy it was to pick-up n’ play, and have a grand ol’ time with it.

Think of Super Smash Bros., where the five B-button attacks help differentiate the vast roster of characters. Except, in this case, pressing the left shoulder buttons will normally be a rush-type assault. Whereas the left and right bumpers will shoot a projectile-based attack. Though they will contain different properties depending on your mech of choice.

With more than 20 mechs on the roster, you’re bound to find one that works for you!

For example, the mech called Sprinkles (yes, there’s a mech called Sprinkles, don’t judge), has a projectile move which traps an opponent in a bubble for a few seconds. So once they start bouncing around the map, they’re completely vulnerable to damage. And you can even combo them for a short while if, and only if, your precision is on point.

Similarities With Super Smash Bros.?

Just like Super Smash Bros., you can also pick up and throw objects at your opponents and use various weapons placed around the battlefield, like missile launchers, hammers and swords… But most importantly, the frying pan! And when you land a powerful attack in Override 2, it has the most satisfying pan-vibration sound ever! I love stuff like this!

There’s even a ‘final smash’ equivalent, where you can stand in one of the yellow circles that appears and charge your ‘ultimate’ attack for devastating damage.

There’s even a ‘final smash’ equivalent, where you can stand in one of the yellow circles that appears and charge your ‘ultimate’ attack for devastating damage.

The roster is decently well-balanced. Though, from my standpoint, I found that some mechs stood head & shoulders above the rest. *Cough* Ultraman *Cough* but it’s still early days. I’m very curious what the tier-list will look like in 2021.

The Game Modes of Override 2

Now in regards to game modes, the tournaments and arena battles are where it’s at. So most of your fighting will either be in Leagues, Quick Play or Versus. All these modes are available to play online, or you can simply face-off against the CPU bots. Though, they’re all essentially mech brawls at the end of the day…

Leagues allows you to gain money for purchasing new mechs and avatars, as well as being the place to rank up and challenge tougher fighters. You’ll also receive sponsors along the way, giving you monetary rewards for completing certain tasks on a timer. Like ‘Use 5 ultimates in 30 minutes’ or ‘Grab an opponent 50 times in one hour’…

Doesn’t that sound like fun to you?… Mmmm, not really.

You’ll also receive sponsors along the way, giving you monetary rewards for completing certain tasks on a timer.

In Leagues, there’s the classic 1-vs-1, 2-vs-2 or 4-player all-out brawl. Alongside some extra variations like Control, where your health will deplete if you stay outside the circular perimeter. Or Xenoswarm, where a pack of weaker mechs will try and take you down in sheer numbers…
No, not Xenoblade, that’s another game.

The formula does just enough to stay fresh, and the stages themselves have some awesome eye-catching visuals and set-pieces… Though some extra modifiers or different types of gameplay would’ve helped set this game further apart.

How One Aspect Can Sour The Entire Experience

One thing that doesn’t stay as fresh, however, is the mech agent, Zoe. She basically acts as your guide for the ins and outs of Leagues, but she just won’t stop talking in-between matches. It gets annoying, fast. They even gave her a backstory relating to certain aspects of Override 2’s lore (if you can call it that). But even though her voice-actor does a great job at portraying the character… Having a fleshed-out story just feels so out of place for an ultra arcade-style game like this.

Honestly… Why is Zoe’s backstory necessary?

Decision

So, is Override 2: Super Mech League worth a buy? Well, it’s definitely got my nod of approval. If you like games similar to Arms, the Nintendo Switch exclusive, then even more so. Though Override 2 is one of those games that’s just pure fun to pick-up n’ play for a few hours. The fighting is tight and responsive, the mechs are varied and stylish and the music itself slots in really, really well! It’s perfect for your daily dose of super mech destruction.

By Anthony Culinas

Good

Override 2: Super Mech League is ideal for a quick pick up n’ play session, containing some tight & responsive controls and 20+ mechs to pilot. Even though the gameplay modes are severely limited in scope, and the mech agent Zoe speaks so much to the point of insanity, there’s still a fun time to be had here.

This game was reviewed using a download code provided by Modus GamesThe Beta Network uses affiliate partnerships, however, this does not influence reviews or any other content published. The Beta Network may earn commissions for products purchased via affiliate links that are on the website.

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